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Ethiopian “silver”

Beauty from Small Things

Ethiopian silver beads are objects of beauty in their own right.     They vary a lot in quality but all bear the tell tale marks of hand craft and this is a large part of the allure they have for me.  In a world bursting with machine made objects these have soul and it’s tangible.  In the pictures below I am deliberately showing the joins, small “cracks” and other imperfections that mark them as handmade.

The Background Story

Most of the beads are made in small rural villages and with the most humble of tools.  When I first began researching them I read that the “silver” (aluminum) ones were made by melting down old aluminum pots and pans which was pretty amazing.  Furthermore, modern aluminum pots don’t melt properly; they can only use vintage ones!  Then I discovered that  old bullet casings are also used for this purpose.  The casings are found by farmers who supply them to the bead makers.  Sadly there are plenty of these around, a brutal reminder of the conflicts suffered by the Ethiopian and Eritrean people.

The casings are melted down in the traditional way over a bed of hot coals.  The process is very laborious and time consuming.  Beads produced in this way take various shapes and sizes but the ones I currently use are either bicones (double cone), heishi beads and narrow cylinders.

Beads of various shapes and sizes are also made from recycled copper and brass.

I am so in awe of the (sadly anonymous) bead makers of Africa and the beauty they produce.  I hope to continue to learn about them and will share information whenever I find it.  They deserve to be known and respected for their work.

Working with beads

Ethiopian silver beads lend themselves to inclusion with textile jewellery and were very effectively incorporated into this piece  which I called “Meet me in Mauritius” as the turquoise and silver make me think of the azure waters of that area.

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Indigo Moon

This unusual necklace is made from genuine African Indigo cloth.  Every aspect of this cloth is handmade in Mali, from spinning the yarn to weaving to dying.  The texture is absolutely fabulous; soft with a typical handwoven irregularity.

The beads I’ve used on it include spherical Ghanaian beads, made by hand from recycled glass which is crushed by hand to a fine powder before being placed in a mold and fired with a cassava stem used to create the hole.  There are also several rather delicately decorated glass beads – also Ghanaian.  The cylindrical brass beads are from Ethiopia and the focal point is a Ghanaian brass pendant.  This was made using the lost wax method which means it is unique as the mold is destroyed when the molten brass is poured into the mold.

This necklace is available. Please contact me by email if you are interested in buying it or knowing more about it.