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Black Stars Textile Choker

textile necklace, beaded choker

Textile necklace with a touch of magic

This striking little choker fastens at the back with an understated sterling silver clasp specially made by South African jeweller Amy Sinovich.  One of the problems creating quality products in South Africa is the limited supply of materials and components.  In this case I could only buy cheap clasps and they ruined the piece.  Amy quickly picked up on what I needed and created this perfect solution.  Take a look at her Instagram page to see the delicate and beautiful work she makes.

The limited but striking palette of red and black with a touch of blue is not out of the ordinary but the delicate hand embroidery and bead work embellishments add a touch of magic that sometimes goes unnoticed until revealed by closer inspection.

I’ve used black Dupioni silk and a contrasting red African wax fabric with hints of black.  The silk is a rarity in South Africa – you can no longer go into Cape Town fabric shops and buy some but have to order.  This is very problematic as I can no longer browse and carefully select and am forced to order in large quantities – but this is a problem for the future.  Sometimes the problems lead to exciting solutions and I’m sure I’ll find one!

An unusual bead

The seed beads I’ve used are the ones that are used by most bead artists in Africa and I believe they are made in Japan.  The focal bead is somewhat unusual.  I bought it a few years ago when we had access to a much greater variety of beads.  It is a glass lampwork bead made  in India.  A real beauty, probably produced in the 1970’s.

Easy to Wear

This piece is very light and extremely easy to wear.  It would look fabulous with denim and a teeshirt for very casual wear or with the ubiquitous little black dress.  Or simply let your imagination run free.

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Sweet Naartjie

I was going to call this necklace “Sweet Clementine” which has a rather more poetic feel to it, but naartjie is the South African word for this sweet and juicy winter fruit.

Two things really excite me about the piece.

The orange glass beads are very difficult to find.  They are Ghanaian recycled glass beads and have that typical matt finish.  It is, of course, when you hold them up to the light that all glass beads have that magical luminosity and these are no exception.  They look so fresh and juicy – hence the name.

The other excitement arises from the fact that this fabric is the real Dutch Vlisco wax fabric.  Their designs and colours are fantastic – it’s worth taking a look at their website.

This necklace can be worn as a choker or slightly longer as you tie it with the rather punchy orange velvet ribbon.

It looks absolutely gorgeous on!

Please contact me for more information or to purchase.

 

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Mermaid’s Tears

Dive into an underwater world.  This isiShweshwe choker is bejeweled with glass beads.  Hand stitching in metallic thread and a gorgeous turquoise velvet ribbon finishes this piece off beautifully!

isiShweshwe has a long and interesting history that began in the East and was introduced to Africa by Dutch and German people.  This is the genuine South African Three Cats textile which is made from 100% cotton.  The pearl beads I’ve used are vintage sixties and of a particularly good quality.  There are also some tiny vintage glass crystal beads.

If you’d like to know more about this piece please feel free to email me.

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Marula

texile necklace

Softly subdued earthy tones imbue a sense of African earth.  I’ve used a gentle brown isiShweshwe as the dominant textile buat also incorporated a lovely wax fabric and some linen.  The splash of turquoise in the isiShweshwe tandletons is complimented in the Krobo beads as well as some of the decorative hand stitching.

The two brass Tuareg beads are new additions to my bead collection and I love the irregularities that attest to their handmade nature.  Tuareg tribe are well known for their beautiful jewelry and it’s a pleasure to tap in to the mystique of this nomadic people.

Also in this picture is one of the hand painted beads made by the Krobo people of Ghana.  These are hand made from recycled glass and refired after hand painting.  The Krobo people have a long history of bead making and these ancient processes are still followed to day.

 

Please contact me if there is anything you’d like to know about this piece, to purchase it or to place an order for something similar.

 

 

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Tropical Paradise

Nadia is a regular customer based in New York.  A bold and stylish woman, she recently commissioned this dramatic sculptural neckpiece which is made from three shweshwe bands and five huge purple “cones” made from deep purple raw silk and topped with Ghanain recycled brass beads.

It would be interesting to see this piece handled in a completely different style…. something earthy?  Something to think about in the future.

I do take commissions but no two pieces will ever be identical.  Please contact me for further information.

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Lady Haleth – African textile choker

This beautiful choker features some of my favorite African fabrics and materials.

Most of the beads used in this piece are vintage and found beads.