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Periwinkle Textile Necklace

I’m always browsing in fabric shops for new inspiration for my handcrafted textile necklaces and recently I fell for a lovely floral print chambray.  It combined beautifully with the velvet and silk but was slightly more challenging to work the shweshwe into the design, until I tried the blue/purple/black print.  But it was the chambray that truly dictated the style of the piece.  It had a delicacy that I wanted to retain and lingering sense of soft spring meadows with fragile multicolored blooms that one doesn’t really find in Africa except perhaps in our indigenous fynbos.

This is an asymmetrical necklace and features a tumbling cluster of tandletons in various sizes.  The dominant colours are periwinkle blue, rose pink and an apple green and these colors are repeated in the tiny beads.

I have used lots of found beads and among these are two very ornate glass beads that I think are wedding cake beads.  I don’t have the expertise to tell whether they are genuine or reproduction but they are beautiful and do have all the characteristics of Venetian wedding cake beads which you can read about in detail in this interesting blog post.

I’ve also used two millefiori beads but these are reproduction and probably come from either China or India.

Periwinkle is a real little beauty and would look gorgeous for just about any occasion from tea with the girls to mother-of-the-bride.  It has a circumference of 69cm and it’s lowest point is 17cm when measured from the base of the neck.  It weighs 145g.

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Meet Me In Mauritius Textile Necklace

Crystal, turquoise sea and lazy days on the beautiful beaches of Mauritius inspire the name of this textile necklace.

The lovely big silver bicones are handmade in Ethiopia.  Beautiful signs of handwork in the form of tiny dents and splashes of metal are definitive of these beads and imbue the piece with authenticity as opposed to mass produced, machine made objects.

This shimmering piece will turn every day into a romantic holiday.

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Maasai Sun

Vibrant red is a colour much favoured by the Maasai people, a semi-nomadic people of Tanzania and Kenya and the dominant colour in this piece which is made from 100% cotton isishweshwe and wax fabric.  The central bead in the pendant is a found vintage ivory bead and the central tandleton is encircled with “silver” prayer beads from Ethiopia.

Maasai Sun detail

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please contact me for more information about this neck adornment.

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Klimt in Cape Town

On a recent bead search I was delighted to purchase some beautiful paper beads from a Zimbabwean trader.  Now paper beads can be find all around Cape Town but often they’re heavily painted. I look for those that have only been varnished so that the original paper is visible.  It is here that you can see the real artistry of the beadmaker.

The little “silver’ bead is a Tuareg bicone.  These are made by melting old aluminum pots and pans.  I have read that they also use old bullet casings in the manufacture of metal beads.   The ostrich eggshell beads have been used for thousands of years particularly by the Khoi people of Southern Africa.  These ones probably came from Namibia.

I also used some found beads on this necklace as well as some contemporary beads such as glass pearls.

The necklace strands are African wax fabric which is actually probably made in China but is still a very popular textile in Africa.

 

South African isiShweshwe was used for the textile buttons/tandletons.

Klimt in Africa fits over a medium sized head.  It retains it’s circular shape when worn.

Like all of my pieces it is very light and easy to wear.

If you’d like to purchase this piece of have any questions about it, please feel free to contact me by email.

 

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