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Atomic Stardust

Atomic Stardust Textile necklace

So what happens when you’re given some deep violet satin and  simultaneously discover that Ultra Violet is the Pantone colour of the year for 2018?

The Pantone introduction to Ultra Violet

“UltraViolet is an enigmatic purple shade that evokes the inventive spirit and imaginative thinking that challenges the status quo. A spiritual, cosmic hue, Ultra Violet pushes the boundaries of what inspires us to look upward and outward to the future. “We are living in a time that requires inventiveness and imagination. From exploring new technologies and the greater galaxy, to artistic expression and spiritual reflection, intuitive Ultra Violet lights the way to what is yet to come.” Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute

Loving non-conformism

Sarah Young of The Independent.co.uk said “…for superior style inspiration, you’re going to want to stick to those who wore the shade with a nuance of nonconformity.”  Think, Jimi Hendrix, David Bowie and Prince.

That said, it’s also a colour associated with many public figures as diverse as  Queen Elizabeth and Karlie Kloss, Hilary Clinton and Beyonce.

Before we get too carried away let’s make one thing clear.  Violet is not purple.  It’s a pure colour of the spectrum while purple is “made” using blue and red.  And if we want to be scientifically correct we have to acknowledge that we can’t even actually see ultra violet because it’s outside of the visible spectrum.  But Pantone didn’t let that fact stand in the way of a fabulous name which is really cool.

ATOMIC STARDUST USD165

Not everyone will feel comfortable stepping out in this powerful piece but for the modern woman who likes to stamp her style on the world this is the perfect adornment.  The detailing is exceptional as you can see very clearly by clicking on the pictures below.

Atomic Stardust textile necklace is currently RESERVED.

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Protea

A totally divine richly embellished necklace that I don’t really want to part with!  The colours flow between gorgeous rich pinks and pure black with accents of mossy green.  There’s an energy happening here that is very exciting.

It all began with a rather lovely wax fabric.  What do I mean by “lovely”?  Well you really get wax fabric and then you get wax fabric!  Although most are incredible and vibrant, some are quite ghastly!  This one is really classy and it determined what the piece would look like from day one.

The asymmetrical cluster of tandletons is composed of colours that speak to the original wax fabric.  This interplay carries through to the bead selection and there are some real beauts here.  Look out for a tiny porcelain bead, a gift from internationally known potter John Bauer.  If you’re interested in knowing more about John and his wonderful work do visit his facebook page.

What I think you’ll love about this necklace is the way you’ll see more interesting little details each time you look at it.

Occasionally prospective clients express a concerns about what they’ll be able to wear the pieces with.  But this is really NOT an issue and this piece is a perfect example.  I’ve tested against black, white, brown, purple an endless variations and combinations and it’s absolutely awesome.

Some useful information: Weight: 126g (about 1/4 of a block of butter) Length: 22cm measured from my collar bones – base of neck to the tip of the necklace.

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Periwinkle Textile Necklace

I’m always browsing in fabric shops for new inspiration for my handcrafted textile necklaces and recently I fell for a lovely floral print chambray.  It combined beautifully with the velvet and silk but was slightly more challenging to work the shweshwe into the design, until I tried the blue/purple/black print.  But it was the chambray that truly dictated the style of the piece.  It had a delicacy that I wanted to retain and lingering sense of soft spring meadows with fragile multicolored blooms that one doesn’t really find in Africa except perhaps in our indigenous fynbos.

This is an asymmetrical necklace and features a tumbling cluster of tandletons in various sizes.  The dominant colours are periwinkle blue, rose pink and an apple green and these colors are repeated in the tiny beads.

I have used lots of found beads and among these are two very ornate glass beads that I think are wedding cake beads.  I don’t have the expertise to tell whether they are genuine or reproduction but they are beautiful and do have all the characteristics of Venetian wedding cake beads which you can read about in detail in this interesting blog post.

I’ve also used two millefiori beads but these are reproduction and probably come from either China or India.

Periwinkle is a real little beauty and would look gorgeous for just about any occasion from tea with the girls to mother-of-the-bride.  It has a circumference of 69cm and it’s lowest point is 17cm when measured from the base of the neck.  It weighs 145g.

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Etosha Textile Necklace

Etosha textile necklace

I’ve just completed a lovely little textile necklace in muted neutral colours.  It’s a breakaway from the typical bright colours of Shweshwe and African print textiles that I’ve been using and its been exciting to see how differently the beads have behaved in combination with ivory, black and soft gold of the textiles.  This is also the first time I’ve included velvet in a necklace and I am very happy with the textural interest it creates.

Velvet from Bellamy & Bellamy

The velvet was a happy find at David Bellamy in Muizenberg.  They have the most amazing range in very high quality British and Dutch velvets and what’s most fabulous is that they aren’t scared of colour.  Their are some bewitching purples and acid greens, iridescent turquoise as well as the more traditional colours, the silvery grey I’ve used in this textile necklace being one of the latter. Of course this might not sound exciting to followers in other parts of the world, but in South Africa there is very little in the way of quality fabric of any kind.

Zulu Teething Beads

The little pale blue grey Imbifinga beads are known by many names, most commonly Job’s Tears.  In South Africa they are known as Zulu teething beads, amatandjies (or amatantyisi).  These tear shaped seeds come from a grass that is similar to corn and in some parts of the world is known as “The Mother of Corn”.

I was fascinated to read that the male flower actually grows through the center of the seed and so there is no need to drill a hole to make the bead – it comes ready made!

“Etosha” is truly a versatile piece as this pics show, looking equally great with denim, Indian cotton and linen.  I have a sense that the possibilities are endless and I know that the artistic customer who commissioned it is going to do some exciting combinations.